Sunday, 13 October 2019

Rufus - Rufusized (1974)

Once you get started....

  

Released on 5th December 1974

Running time 37.06

Rufus had released on very unsuccessful debut album of funk/soul in 1973, and changed their line-up considerably for this comparative breakthrough offering the following year, so much so that they were virtually a new band. The album provided a showcase for the vocal talents of one Chaka Khan.

TRACK LISTING

1. Once You Get Started
2. Somebody's Watching You
3. Pack'd My Bags 
4. Your Smile
5. Rufusized
6. I'm A Woman (I'm A Backbone)
7. Right Is Right
8. Half Moon
9. Please Pardon Me (You Remind Me Of A Friend)
10. Stop On By                                                                   

With a few seconds of the upbeat funky brass and wah-wah-driven Once You Get Started beginning, Chaka Khan arrives with her distinctive multi-pitched vocals. Sometimes high, sometimes low, sometimes gruff and gritty, sometimes sweet and melodious - her range is most impressive. Fellow vocalist Tony Maiden provides a great contribution too and the music is top notch - ass-kicking funk of the highest quality. Just check out that throbbing, rubberband bass and those funky guitars. Rufus gained appearances on Soul Train on the back of this and you can hear why. The song's rhythm has an early disco groove that was actually quite ground-breaking. The sound is superb too - big, full, warm and bassy.

Somebody's Watching You is a cookin' piece of down 'n' dirty funk/soul - tuneful and earthy at the same time. Its influence on Michael Jackson's Off The Wall era material is clear. Pack'd My Bags is more of a straight ahead sumptuous slow soul number than a funker, despite a funky break in the middle. Your Smile is far more laid-back and sublimely soulful. The sound quality on here is outstanding and again, I can't state it enough, this is some of the best seventies soul around. Khan's vocal on this song is magnificent.


Rufusized is an early Commodores-style, organ-driven funky semi-instrumental with only occasional backing vocals, great saxophone and funky guitar as well. The solid funk of  I'm A Woman (I'm A Backbone) is a prototype I'm Every Woman and typical of the burgeoning number of strong female singers and songs that emerged in the early mid-seventies. Sisters were doing it for themselves. Right Is Right is so deliciously funky it hurts. That guitar is right on the money, man. The funk continues apace on the upbeat, frantic Half Moon, which is chock full of organ breaks, pulsating bass and fast shuffling drums.

Please Pardon Me (You Remind Me Of A Friend) is representative of a lot of the soul songs of the period with a mini-story based within its three soulful minutes. Stop On By ends this excellent album with an appealing slice of slow-burning, bassy funky soul. It was a cover of a Bobby Womack song. Overall, this album was one of the seventies' finest examples of funk-edged soul.

Below is a clip from Soul Train of Rufus performing Once You Get Started.


B+

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