Sunday, 17 March 2019

Lou Reed - Lou Reed (1972)


  

Released April 1972

This is a strange album, released after the demise of The Velvet Underground, before they gained "cult" kudos and before Lou Reed gained his own David Bowie-inspired respect. Apart from "Berlin", "Going Down" and "Wild Child", all the material had been recorded before by The Velvet Underground while Reed was still with them. Most of The Velvet Underground versions have now come to light on "deluxe editions" of their albums. The versions on this album are, on the whole, far more "rock" in their sound, with more punch to them and a general feel of being more complete.

A lot of critics, over the years, have given this album a serious pasting. I do not have the same problems with it, in fact I like it.

TRACK LISTING

1. I Can't Stand It
2. Going Down
3. Walk And Talk It
4. Lisa Says
5. Berlin
6. I Love You
7. Wild Child
8. Love Makes You Feel
9. Ride Into The Sun
10. Ocean

"I Can't Stand It" is a rocky, riffy, latter-day unsurprisingly Velvet Underground-influenced number to kick off the album in fine glammy style (of course, as I mentioned earlier, it was also recorded before this album's release by The Velvet Underground, when Reed was still with them). Yes, the production is slightly grainy and tinny, but personally I don't find it too detrimental. It is still a good track. I have to say, though, that the "2014 remaster" that is on the remastered "The Velvet Underground" album is the better version. The new track, "Going Down" has Reed going quiet and reflective, as he always could, over a fetching backing of piano (Rick Wakeman, would you believe), guitar (Steve Howe, would you even more believe) and female backing vocals. Again, I really quite like this one. A catchy riffiness and solid rock beat makes "Walk And Talk It" another more than acceptable track. The original Velvet Underground "demo" is much more laid-back and melodic, having none of the latter version's almost punky rock attack. There is a case for both versions. I like them equally.

"Lisa Says" is an enjoyable amalgam of two tunes - the first half of the track slower and rock piano/guitar-driven, the latter half lively, carefree and upbeat before it reverts back to the majesty of the first passage. It is the first half of it that forms the basis of the Velvet Underground "2014 remaster" original. "Berlin" is the first version of the song that appeared on the 1973 album of the same name. It is a long more appealing version, with a laid-back jazzy beginning and some solid slow rock parts in the middle. Personally, I would have preferred this version on the later album.

"I Love You" is a short but catchy philosophical number with more muscular, mid-pace rock bits and a strong vocal from Reed. The Velvet Underground "session" recording of it is almost completely different, without the rock parts. It has a much looser vocal over a slightly jarring keyboard backing. The original "demo" is even more grainy and sparse, although plaintively moving and featuring some atmospheric guitar. This new version is a vast improvement. The rocking, typically Lou Reed "Wild Child" was, apparently a Velvet Underground "demo" from 1970 but there is no recording available of it. It is the most "glam rock" - driven by riffs, drums and bass - instantly infectious track on the album. Reed's vocal and lyrics are quite Dylanesque in places.

"Love Makes You Feel" is an airy, vaguely hippy track in both its sound and lyrics. It ends with some rolling drum work and a very Velvet Underground guitar break. The original Velvet Underground "demo" is once again slower and less powerful. The guitar bit at the end is still there, but with less of the thumping drums. "Ride Into The Sun" is a muscular number with some seriously good guitar soloing from Steve Howe. The old proggy could rock after all. It has a bit of a Doors vibe to it, for me. The Velvet Underground's "session" version is far more hippy-ish, led by some churchy organ and a quiet, plaintive vocal from Reed. It sounds very Beatles-esque, (something the later version on this album does not), featuring Lennon-esque vocals and a "Sun King" bass line. "Ocean" is another Doors-esque, psychedelic-influenced number that, even in its new, Lou Reed incarnation sounds very Velvet Underground. It is a throwback to those druggy days. Despite some good parts, it is a bit of a mess, I have to admit. The Velvet Underground "session" version is more trippy and actually is the better one, in my opinion. In fact, their "demo" version is even better than that one too.

Overall, for me, this album is nowhere near as bad as many would have you believe. What were good Velvet Underground unreleased tracks are given an impressive rock makeover and are certainly listenable and energetic.

B-

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